Part of the fun of working for a great agency is being encouraged to think. Here are some of the things we’re thinking about.

Handling PR for Tech Clients? Don’t Do These Things.

June 12, 2017 Molly Garvey

The technology industry continues to grow, and as it does, it becomes more challenging for tech companies to push through the noise and reach their customers. A strong (and strategic) media presence can put a company in front of its target audience. But media coverage doesn’t just happen on its own. Tech companies need a PR pro who knows what she’s doing.

That’s great news for firms that specialize in B2B and tech PR (like the Bradford Group). But for public relations folk that are new to working with technology clients, here are three tips on what not to do.  tech PR

Don’t promise national news coverage – tomorrow.

If the technology company you’re working with is new or hasn’t been in the media before, declaring that you’ll secure a feature story for them in TechCrunch immediately is a risky move. Securing national coverage for any company takes time. It’s important to create a foundation that you can build upon. Generate publicity in your client’s local or regional publications first, which you can then leverage on a national level.

That doesn’t mean you can’t start forming relationships with journalists at the major national outlets now. Just be sure to help your client understand how PR works and why it’s important to be realistic and strategic with your media outreach.

Don’t ignore the news.

Timing can be everything when it comes to securing media coverage. Staying on top of current events gives you a leg up with the media. Take a breaking tech story and offer journalists another angle that no one else has covered. Or pitch your client as an expert resource available for commentary on the topic.

I like setting up Google Alerts for keywords that are important to my clients’ businesses and industries. Receiving them in real time throughout the day allows me to jump on something as soon as it comes through. You can also set up alerts to monitor your client’s competitors. Are they getting coverage on topics your client could comment on? Maybe your client can offer a rebuttal or a different take on things.

Using simple, everyday language shows journalists that you understand that their goal is to provide their readers with information that’s not only relative to them, but that they can understand.

Don’t use tech talk.

NFC. DevOps. PPI. Caching. IDE. What does any of that even mean?

The technology world is filled with jargon, and your client is likely so engrossed in the industry that it might be hard for him to remember to use plain-speak. That’s your job as his public relations partner. Ask questions. Spend time learning the industry. Immerse yourself in that world so that you can speak knowledgeably – and simply – on the subject.

When you’re writing a pitch, article or press release, think about it as if you’re talking to your mom. Using simple, everyday language shows journalists that you understand that their goal is to provide their readers with information that’s not only relative to them, but that they can understand.

 

What advice do you have for PR pros working with tech companies? Leave your comments below.

 

Photo credit: perzonseo Business woman working on laptop in her office via photopin (license)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*